Essay on Exploring Death in Death in Venice

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Exploring Death in Death in Venice Death in Venice by Thomas Mann, is a story that deals with mortality on many different levels. There is the obvious physical death by cholera, and the cyclical death in nature: in the beginning it is spring and in the end, autumn. We see a kind of death of the ego in Gustav Aschenbach's dreams. Venice itself is a personification of death, and death is seen as the leitmotif in musical terms. It is also reflected in the idea of the traveler coming to the end of a long fatiguing journey. It must also be noted there are no women in the story with prominent roles. The hero's wife is long dead and his daughter has been married and gone for many years. Any women in the story are merely in…show more content…
9, 14). It is ironic that Aschenbach, who had written his book The Abject "as a rebuke to the excess of a psychology-ridden age" (13) succumbs to an egoless state, not only in the last grotesque dream, but directly after it in his conscious mind as well. From this point on, Gustav becomes totally shameless. (We have seen this theme of loss of shame as being a kind of death, and actually leading to literal death as well, in Salman Rushdie's Shame.) Mann's use of Venice as a backdrop is critical. Venice, an ancient city, inexorably sinking beneath the water, a "forbidden spot" (38) with "stagnant lagoons" (28) the "fallen queen of the sea" (36). Venice, with a "faintly rotten scent" (37) "half fairy tale, half snare" (55) "that hid sickness for love of gain . . . (56). The city that had "a disreputable secret [like] his own" (57). In musical terms, death is the leitmotif, the theme keeps reappearing: heard in the overture (the first stranger Aschenbach sees in Munich), continually sounded in the Venetian passages (more odd men), swelling to a crescendo of hysterical laughter and swirling pipes of Pan, and, in the

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