Ethical Decision-Making Analysis

1032 Words5 Pages
Impact of mood on ethical decision-making. Few studies have looked at the various effects of mood ethical decision-making. Most have focused on the differences between positive and negative mood or affective states. It is often unclear whether different emotions will promote or discourage ethical decision making in an organization (Gaudine & Thorne, 2001). Gaudine and Thorne developed a model in order to attempt to understand how emotions affect individual's ability to make ethical decisions in an organization. The authors attempt to use a cognitive-developmental foundation to create a model of emotion and ethical decision making. Cognitive developmental theory posits that people's perception of morality progresses as they develop. People's…show more content…
According to these authors, both positive and negative biases affect how the health care professional works with patients. Most models of ethical decision-making rely on rational thinking but do not account for the role of emotions and mood influencing the ability to think rationally. Decisions influenced by affect are more likely to be automatic and rapid than slow and effortful, resulting in suboptimal in some ethical dilemmas (Rogerson et al., 2011). In decision-making, individuals are prone to heuristics, which lead to biases. Individuals are subject to the affective heuristic, in which all stimuli lead to automatic affective evaluations of the stimuli and decisions based on those…show more content…
Sensemaking is referred to as the process that people use to give meaning to experience. In a study by Kligyte, Connelly, Thiel, and Devenport (2013),undergraduates justified five controversial public statements to scorers. The participant's emotions were manipulated through the use of feedback from two doctorate level students. Anger was induced by the confederates informing the participants- they scored poorly due to a "hard grader" (Kligyte, Connelly, Thiel, & Devenport, 2013, p. 304). Fear was induced by informing the participants that the scorers were experiencing difficulty scoring due to a pattern that they found particularly concerning. The participant then completed the Ethical Decision-Making Measure. The results suggest that anger inhibited participants ethical decision-making abilities and sensemaking. On the other hand, fear appeared to facilitate ethical decision-making when compared to anger the neutral emotion condition. The authors suggest that fear cued a broader information search in hope of reducing uncertainty and
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