Ethics Of The American Counseling Association

880 WordsDec 3, 20154 Pages
According to the American Counseling Association (ACA, 2014) Code of Ethics, ethical principles are based on a set of values that include autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, fidelity, and veracity. These ethics apply to all types of counseling including both group and individual therapy; however, different aspects of these ethical guidelines must be considered based on the therapeutic approach. This paper will identify several of these ethical issues as they relate specifically to group counseling, while also evaluating how these differences compare to ethical guidelines within an individual approach. Based on this information, a final analysis will be provided on when therapists should choose group versus individual for a client. Identifying Ethical Issues in Group Counseling According to the American Counseling Association (2014) Code of Ethics, ethical principles are based on a set of values that include autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, fidelity, and veracity. As an editor with International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, Virginia Brabender (2006) further clarifies these principles as they relate to group therapy through focusing on four of these values: beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, and fidelity. Beneficence and Nonmaleficence Beneficence is a caregiver’s responsibility to promote work that will benefit the welfare of the client, while also preventing or removing harm. For therapists, this obligation includes
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