Eveline Essay examples

721 Words Nov 29th, 2012 3 Pages
Harsha Perera
Professor Hogan
English Comp 201 014
October 2, 2012 Comparison of Eveline and Connie “Eveline” and “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been” are similar stories set in different eras. “Eveline” is a short story written by James Joyce. “Where are you going, Where have you been” is a short story written by Joyce Carol Oates. Eveline and Connie are two teenage girls who are ultimately trapped by the influences of their cultures. The church plays a heavy influence on Eveline throughout the story. Eveline is conflicted on whether she should leave with Frank or stay behind with her father. The unknown priest mentioned in the story appears to be significant because of his absence. The priest represents the
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Connie on the other hand is affected by the pop culture of her time. The pop culture works as Connie’s connection from the real world to her fantasy world. “Connie sat with her eyes closed in the sun, dreaming and dazed with the warmth about her as if this were a kind of love, the caresses of love, and her mind slipped over onto thoughts of the boy she had been with the night before and how nice he had been, how sweet it always was, not the way someone like June would suppose but sweet, gentle, the way it was in movies and promised in songs;”(Oates 211). Connie enjoys escaping her life by listening to music and daydreaming about boys. She gets her fantasies about romance mostly from songs on the radio. The happiness she finds with boys is mostly fixed on these romantic fantasies and not the boys themselves. When Arnold shows up at her house, she finds herself entranced by him. ““Bobby King?” she said. “I listen to him all the time. I think he’s great.””(Oates 212). Since she notices that Arnold is playing the same music she listens to she lowers her guard a little. She lowers her guard because the music he is listening to makes her think that he is around her age.
Eveline and Connie are both subjugated and misguided by the culture of their times. Eveline is obligated to do her duties as expected from the church and subdued by a patriarchal
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