Evidence Based Practice Changes By Jean Martin Charcot And Florence Nightingale's Era

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Evidence-based Practice Changes “To take away from neurology all the discoveries made by Charcot would be to render it unrecognizable” (Jay, 2000, p. 10). However, nurses of today recognize that had Lidwina of Schiedam lived during Jean Martin Charcot’s (1825-1893) and Florence Nightingale’s era (1859-1969), Lidwina’s nursing care would have been person-centered and focused on the environment and her physical factors (Alligood, 2014; Murray & McDonald, 2005). Health care professionals of today are fortunate to now have a clinical description and classification of multiple sclerosis. As a result, with new discoveries, nurses continue to create, analyze, and evaluate nursing concepts, philosophies and theories using research-based evidence and clinical expertise (Institute of Medicine, 2001). The new discoveries, quality improvements, and evidence-based care that has changed the course of multiple sclerosis diagnosis, treatment, and care since Jean Martin Charcot and Florence Nightingale’s time is encouraging and exciting for those that live with the disease. New technologies and critical milestones abound. For example, in 1981 the first MRI pictures of a brain affected by MS was produced ("Research News and Progress," 2016). Also, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been instrumental in allowing more precise diagnosis and important biomarkers for determining the effect of treatments from clinical trials (Koutsouraki & Michmizos, 2014). These remarkable advances in

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