Examine the Different Methods for Giving Constructive (Practical) Feedback to Learners and Discuss How These Can Motivate Learners.

1153 WordsJul 12, 20135 Pages
Unit 9: Mini-essay: Examine the different methods for giving constructive (practical) feedback to learners and discuss how these can motivate learners. Giving constructive feedback is crucial; without it learners cannot learn (Rogers, 2004). When used to emphasise progress rather than failure, it motivates learners, building confidence and enabling them to recognise mistakes as part of a process that brings them closer to their learning goals. It can help both teacher and student to identify further learning opportunities or action to be taken. Feedback can be formal, such as after marking an assignment or observing practice, or given informally during a lesson (Gravells, 2012.) It can also be written or verbal. Written feedback…show more content…
This boosts morale by giving the student ownership of the solution. It also develops a student’s ability to carry out future self assessment and encourages reflection. Lastly, it allows the teacher to gauge how much the student has understood. This helps when setting future goals that are challenging but achievable – crucial to engagement. Focusing on only two or three key points during feedback means students are not overwhelmed by any critical comments, preventing them from becoming dispirited (Avis, Fisher and Thompson, 2010). There is also a limit to how much new information a learner can grasp at once. Praising what the student has done well, outlining areas that need further development and then ending on another positive note will motivate the student and help prevent them focusing on any aspect they may perceive as negative. Petty (2009) says this makes feedback sound more like advice and less like criticism. For oral feedback to be constructive, it must be clear, jargon free, factual and provide reasons for any success or failure so that students can act upon any areas that require improvement. This is supported by research conducted by Weeden, Winter and Broadfoot (2000 cited in Avis, Fisher and Thompson, 2010, p.172) involving 200 learners, aged from eight to 19. The study found that simple comments, ticks or evaluative comments such as “good work”, while welcomed by

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