Examine the Main Characteristics of Conversion and Mystical Experience

857 Words Feb 6th, 2011 4 Pages
A conversion is a religious experience that changes a persons beliefs from one religion to another, there are three types of conversion with characteristics varying among them. Mystical experience however is a more extreme form of experience, which is not just seeing hearing or feeling someone but a deeper union with god.

Non-volitional is a non voluntary conversion which is forced on someone. This usually means that the person is hostile to the belief they later come to hold, as it is forced it is not sought after either. God is usually involved by a direct action such as a voice or lights, which results in the conversion being sudden. The scale of these conversions are massive as they are dramatic and spectacular due to the
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This searching was carried out by Tolstoy himself without any intervening act by God, and was a gradual process which took many weeks. As Tolstoy searched within himself for the answer,it was a lesser change and happened on a low key scale including thoughts rather than sudden and dramatic lights and voices.

The last type of conversion is self surrender and every conversion has an element of self surrender as in every conversion there has to be a tipping point where the person gives in to the belief they will become to believe otherwise it would not be a conversion.

C.S.Lewis' conversion centered massively around self surrender, as for months and months he rejected God who cam to him many nights with his beliefs. Over and over he rejected them beliefs until one night C.S.Lewis reached his tipping point and accepted God coming to him. He got to his knees and began to pray, he had finally accepted God's beliefs and teachings, which resulted in his conversion.

Mystical experience is on a deeper meaning then just feeling, seeing or hearing God. Mystical experience involves a union with God, in which you become one with Him. In the Upanishads this union with God is described as "rivers flow to their rest in the ocean and there leave behind them name and form, so the knower liberated from name and form, reaches the divine Person beyond the beyond."