Examples Of Conflict In Chicken Run

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Which came first the chicken or the egg? Chicken Run is a comedy escape drama set on a chicken farm in Yorkshire. Mrs. Tweedys and her goofy but menacing husband Mr. Tweedy, are a troubled middle-aged couple who run their own chicken farm or as the chickens see it, prison camp. With its barbed wire and sky-high fences, the film stars the chickens ginger, Bunty, Babs, Fowler and friends, and of course Rocky Rhodes- The Flying Rooster! Ginger is one of the special chickens on Tweedys farm who is desperate to escape, but she is always being held back by her floundering partners.
At every attempt they fail, and their time is slowly running out when Tweedys farm soon introduces Tweedy’s homemade chicken pies. Just as Gingers loses all hope in ever
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Intergroup conflict arises when there are ‘negative relations between social groups’. (Myers et al., 2010). Intergroup conflict first appears in this film when Ginger, one of the main characters in the film, tries time and time again to escape the dreaded chicken farm. Her fellow ‘prisoners’ do not support or agree with her decision of wanting to be free. They are blind to fact that there is anything else outside those barbed wires for a laying hen in the world. Mac is probably one of the only hens in the beginning who helps, supports and believes in Ginger. Babs, another fellow hen soon follows but is rather ditzy and seems to agree to any plan if she doesn’t need to conduct it herself. Bunty however, is very level headed and believes Gingers ideas and notions are ridiculous and farfetched, which does not cause a large amount of conflict, but still a speck of conflict is portrayed. Fowler is on Buntys team, and agrees that the idea of escaping is too farfetched for a little…show more content…
From the beginning of the film, there is evidence of both hostile and instrumental aggression in the various scenes throughout the film, especially those of which the Tweedys appear. The concept of intergroup conflict is heavily pronounced in the storyline between the characters of Fowler and Rocky, along with some appearing between Ginger and Bunty. Finally, the concept of stereotyping is unmistakably evident throughout the entire film as the chickens are undermined by the couple. The examples of these three social psychological concepts are evident throughout the film, and with findings of prior research linking to all the examples mentioned above, ‘Chicken Run’ is a beneficial exhibit of these
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