Examples Of Scout In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Scouts character is both Inquisitive and observant. Scout asks a variety of tough questions. Most of the questions aren't very politically correct, but she does not know better. As a child, Scout doesn't understand the full reasons of what happens around her, making her an observer. You should keep in mind, that To Kill a Mockingbird shows two versions of Scout, the little girl experiencing the story and her as an adult, Jean Louise Finch who tells the story. when she grows up she can relate to what has happened and recognizes that her father is exceptional man. But as a child Scout complained and said that their father didn't do anything, he never went hunting, he did not play poker or fish or drink or smoke. He would sit in the living room…show more content…
Remember that in many ways To Kill a Mockingbird is Scout's way of looking back in time and remembering her childhood. The adult Scout is able to understand the impact of some of the events better than when she was a child living through them. Scout hates school because her learning is slowed down or stopped. Her teacher was horrified that she already knew how to read. Scout could be happy that she is ahead of everyone, but she is bored waiting for the rest of the class to catch up to her reading level, she doesn't have much respect for either of the teachers as she describes them in the story. She tries to give the most sympathy she can toward the worn out Miss Caroline and when Scout sees her crying she said "Had her conduct been more friendly toward me, I would have felt sorry for her.” (2) Scout gets very offended by what Miss Gates commented on about African Americans after her what it seemed like loyal and support for the Jews in Hitler's Europe. a way to show her maturity, at the end of the story she realizes that she doesn't have much more to learn, maybe…show more content…
It is the question of what does it means to be a lady. Scout finds it hard to do the things that a lady would do because she is a tomboy. Her brother sometimes criticizes her for acting like a girl, on the other hand at times he complains that she's not girly enough. Dill wants to marry her, but he doesn't mean that he wants to spend time with her. Lots of the boys at school are intimidated by her strength, even though she is told that she must learn to handle herself in a ladylike way. Strangely enough, the women that come in and out of her life have harder requirements on her than the men do. Scout being a tomboy drives Aunt Alexandra to be distracted. Miss Caroline sees Scout's outspokenness and honesty as rudeness. funnily enough, the person she want’s to please most is the least concerned about her acting in a certain way. She tells Jem, "'I asked him if I was a problem and he said not much of one, at most one he could always figure out, and not to worry my head a second about botherin' him.'" In the end, when she explains why the sheriff could not charge Boo with Bob Ewell's murder, she becomes the kind of person who makes her father extremely
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