Examples Of Social Expectations In Great Expectations

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The plot revolves around Pip’s change in social class and his happiness with it. From the beginning, Pip is exposed to different social classes and how they are different from each other, how society sees them, etc. He is, at a young age, removed from his home, and given the means to be in a higher social class.“‘I am instructed to communicate to him,’ said Mr Jaggers[...], ‘that he will come into a handsome property [...] immediately removed from his present sphere [...] and from this place, and be brought up as a gentleman”(Dickens 245). In this quote, Pip meets Jaggers, who informs him that a mysterious benefactor has given him the means to fulfill his dream of being a gentleman. In this section of the story, Pip believes that being a gentleman is solely about social status and the amount of money one has. His encounters with Estella have made him believe that he will only be loved and worthy of it if he is wealthy. This, however, is not what Pip finds to be true later on in life, when he reflects on his poor spending habits and how he replaced those…show more content…
The Industrial Revolution brought many changes, and also made it possible for people to make money and rise social status, instead of just being born into it. Because of this, Pip’s expectations of being a gentleman grew. He believed someone’s clothes dictated their social status and worth as a person. “We Britons had at that time particularly settled that it was treasonable to doubt our having and our being the best of everything: otherwise, while I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty. ”(Dickens 286). When Pip arrives in London, he is greatly disappointed. He believed London to be a beautiful city, but instead found quite a miserable place. Pip began to realise that things were not like he thought they were as soon as he arrives in
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