Examples Of The Six Theories

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The Six Theories What is the cause of somebody deciding to commit a crime? Is it as simple as a quick decision weighing the risks versus rewards? Is it more complex like a characteristic imbedded in their DNA? What about their socioeconomic standing, a learned behavior, or a life event? If you believe there is a logical explanation to the question, you may believe it to be the Rational Choice Theory. Maybe you believe it to be the Trait Theory, Social Structure Theory, Social Process Theory, Social Conflict Theory, or Development Theory. Could it be a combination of several theories? While the following is no more than a brief highlight of the aforementioned theories, you hopefully will have a better understanding of each after reading.…show more content…
The theory suggests that a certain people commit crimes as opposed to others because the somebody violating the law as suggested the benefits outweigh the risks of getting caught. An example would be two (2) people shopping in Wal-Mart and one deciding to steal a video game because the reward of being able to play it outweighs the risk of being caught. While the other did not decide the same, they both used the same decision-making process. Trait Theory or Contemporary Trait Theories believes that people act based upon there characteristics or traits, meaning how someone feels, what they believe, perceive, or how they act in certain situations. The Trait Theory seeks to determine whether or not there is a discernable link(s) between crimes being committed and the traits of the person(s) committing a particular crime. The theory suggests they have located a link between certain behavior, which has been altered by criminal’s DNA, neurological issues, or blood disorders that alter somebody’s social behavior, and criminal acts. For example, someone will commit a crime…show more content…
According to the theory, those in poor communities are more likely to commit a crime versus someone in a wealthier community “because they are unable to achieve monetary or social success in any other way.” (Siegel) Social Structure Theory is further broken down into three categories; social disorganization, social strain, and cultural deviance theories. To highlight, social disorganization implies people in poor environments break the law because of lack of social control. Social strain suggests crime is committed out of frustration by those unable to better themselves and cultural deviance theories show that certain cultures approve of such behavior. Social Process Theory is divided into three (3) groups; social learning theory, social control theory, and labeling theory. Social learning theory believes that those who commit crimes do so because it is a learned behavior, similar to that of learning to read or ride a bicycle. Social control theory shows that while everyone has the potential or capability of committing crimes, those that do not do so because of social standards. “Social reaction or labeling
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