Excellence and the Fulfillment of One's Purpose is the Philosophy of Classical Greece

1158 WordsFeb 4, 20185 Pages
An ancient philosophy of classical Greece, in its most basic sense, Arete means “excellence of any kind”, but more specifically to the culture of the period in which it originated meant “the notion of excellence and the fulfillment of one’s purpose and/or function: in other words, the act of living up to one's full potential”. Example: Aeneas, from the Aeneid, is an example of someone who possesses the foundational aspects of the Arete philosophy. As a Trojan leader, Aeneas respects prophecy and attempts to incorporate the idea of his own destiny into his actions, in spite of emotional impulses that conflict with his fated duties. His ability to accept his destined path despite his unhappiness in doing so makes him a graceful hero and a worthy recipient of the honor and favor the gods bestow upon him. His compassion for the sufferings of others, even in conjunction with a single-minded devotion to his duty, is another aspect of his heroism. Sympathetic to the weariness of others on the journey, he delivers speeches to his fleet to keep the men’s spirits high. Aristeia* A scene in the rhetorical devices of epic poetry where a hero in battle has his most excellent and glorified points. Aristeia can be the effect of the loss of life for the protagonist. Example 1: Book 5 of the Iliad is an example of aristeia, in which Diomedes prays to Athena for revenge, and the goddess endows him with superhuman strength and the extraordinary power to discern gods on the field of

More about Excellence and the Fulfillment of One's Purpose is the Philosophy of Classical Greece

Open Document