Explainations of the Fog of Fear in Alan Axelrod’s, “Nothing to Fear: Lessons in Leadership from FDR”

557 Words Feb 19th, 2018 2 Pages
Fear can be, and can come from, many things. It can come from everyday life experiences, such as taking tests in school, or giving a speech in a meeting at work. Or from things that frighten more people than just yourself. Such as going to war, being in an accident, or in the midst of a public shooting. In Alan Axelrod’s, “Nothing to Fear: Lessons in Leadership from FDR”, Alan talks about fear, and his points are valid, for fear is like a fog, it can be overcome, and that mankind has had worse things to fear than what is feared in his writing.

Alan Axelrod makes a very valid point in his text, “Nothing to Fear: Lessons in Leadership from FDR”, when he compares fear to fog. “..fear is not so much the sensation accompanying the realization of danger, but a fog..” which means that fear is not just something you fear, but instead, something that clouds your vision. With too much fear, it’s all a person can see, they have nightmares, flashbacks, and other things that make even the small things in life, frightening. Yet, there are ways to overcome this fog, just like there are ways to overcome the fear itself. Evenso, Alan Axelrod clearly places a good argument in relating fear to fog.

In, “Nothing to Fear: Lessons in Leadership from FDR”, Axelrod constructs an agreeable altercation in saying that fear can be overcome. In his writing, Alan Axelrod talks about how Franklin D. Roosevelt overcame his fear of plio. Having been diagnosed with polio and…

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