Exploring Different Data Collection Methods

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Honolulu University 2015 Exploring Different Data Collection Methods Statistical Methods in Business & Economics (BUS405) Ching Sum Jessie Ha (80600402) Honolulu University 2015 Exploring Different Data Collection Methods Statistical Methods in Business & Economics (BUS405) Ching Sum Jessie Ha (80600402) Introduction Data is collected to learn the effectiveness of a particular tool in preventing defects or to look into the cause of a particular defect (Burrill, Ledolter, p.381). Data removes the trepidation and uncertainty of an unknown element. One reason for collecting data is to gain an understanding of the data by organizing and graphing the individual values (Albert, Rossman, p.1). Secondly, and most…show more content…
However, the nature of this knowledge varies and reflects your study objectives. Some study objectives seek to make standardized and systematic comparisons, others seek to study a phenomenon or situation in detail. These different intentions require different approaches and methods, which are typically categorized as either quantitative or qualitative. I. Quantitative Research Quantitative research provides quantified answers to research problems and is commonly associated with positivistic (objectively measurable), experimental research (Pope, Mays, 1995). Quantitative research typically explores specific and clearly defined questions that examine the relationship between two events, or occurrences, where the second event is a consequence of the first event, e.g. ‘What impact did the program have on children’s school performance?’ To test the causality or link between the program and children’s school performance, quantitative researchers will seek to maintain a level of control of the different variables that may influence the relationship between events and recruit respondents randomly. Quantitative approaches address the ‘what’ of the program. They use a systematic standardized approach and employ methods such as surveys (Hawe, Degeling, Hall, 1990) and ask questions such as ‘What activities did the program run?’ or
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