Exploring the Current day Impact of the Canadian Indian Residential School System

2758 Words 12 Pages
When someone speaks of great inequalities and human rights violations, very seldom is Canada as a nation (in a broader sense,) conjured together with these thoughts. However, in reality probably some of the greatest human right violations within our time and even within the late modern period, and most concerning examples of them, can be found through looking back into Canadian history. For many this may be a surprise to hear, however for others, specifically the native population of Canada, we can assume this is well understood. Commonly known today as Indian residential schools, a great act of wrong was committed under the command and leadership of the Canadian government starting back with elementary roots through the passage of the …show more content…
Corporal punishment and cruelties were seen when such things as previously discussed, like practice of cultural and usage of native language, were practiced by native children in these residential schools. Lack of basic life necessities in these residential schools also resulted in disturbing mortality rates. Several doctors commissioned to inspect and report on health standings of children in residential school, found results that would bring horror in relation to current world standards. One doctor by the name of Dr. Bryce, found that in Western Canadian residential schools between 1894-1908, throughout a five year period thirty to sixty percent of a class would die (Bryce, 1922). These findings and others were published in Dr. Bryce's book, The Story of a National Crime: Being a Record of the Health Conditions of the Indians of Canada from 1904 to 1921. In total it is estimated over 3000 children died from disease and lack of basic necessities during the time of government run Indian residential schools in Canada from 1884 to the final closing in 1996 (The Canadian Press, 2013). Mortality rates demonstrate well the scale and cruelty of the human right violations that occurred in these residential schools, but only begins to touch the surface of other atrocities such as previously mentioned. Physical and sexual abuse was common and in most cases severe, and punishments and deprivation
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