Extended Formal Analysis: Biographical and Cultural Criticism on the Lords of Discipline

634 WordsOct 8, 20073 Pages
Extended Formal Analysis: Biographical and Cultural Criticism on The Lords of Discipline Conroy displays his life through his novel, The Lords of Discipline, to give readers a visual demonstration of how life connections can transform the entity of a novel. Conroy's attendance to the Citadel, his family, and the South helped influence his innovative writing style. "A lifetime in a Southern family negated any possibility that he [Will/Conroy] could resign from the school under any conditions other than unequivocal disgrace (6)." Conroy's family held a strong control over his will to renounce the hardship of the Citadel. A pervasive admiration for…show more content…
"I did not participate in the rituals of the plebe system. Cruelty was easier to forgive than forget (109)." Conroy's deep connection to the South allowed him to see first hand the different treatments given to those of the upper classes and the African Americans. By making the main character, Will McLean, non-racist, Conroy innovates an idea that had been repressed at the time where the setting of the book takes place, during the late 1960's Civil Rights movement, and addresses key points of the racism that occurred. Conroy was able to write about the profound hardships of the Institute by invoking his real life experiences from attending there. By grasping the sincere fear and joy that only a cadet can feel while attending the Institute, Conroy allows the reader to sympathize with the strength of the men who endured the system and acquired the ring. "I want to speak for the boys who were violated by this school… who left ashamed and broke and dishonored, who departed from the Institute with wounds and bitter grievances (145)." Pat Conroy's vindicated book, The Lords of Discipline,

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