Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close By Jonathan Safran Foer

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3 Parallel Events: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close The book Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close contains many aspects of the real-life hardships of 9/11 and the Holocaust, as well as the mystery of the Sixth Borough of New York. These events help create a better understanding of life under the influence of conflict and the choices characters are forced to make as a result of the conflict. Jonathan Safran Foer 's novel focuses on a boy named Oskar who loses his father in the destruction of the Twin Towers, his mute grandfather 's grief, and the stories of the Sixth Borough his father told him. The history told in this novel comes from multiple generations, which helps create a greater range of understanding grief. The novel interprets…show more content…
Foer explains the mystery of the borough through Mr. Schell 's storytelling: "But even though most people will say they have no time for or reason to believe in the Sixth Borough, and don’t believe in the Sixth Borough, they will still use the word ‘believe’” (217). After the death of his father, Oskar never forgot the Sixth Borough as he searched for clues of the existence of the Sixth Borough all around New York City. The Holocaust was a traumatic event in the 1900s, and it had major consequences on Oskar’s Grandfather. Both of Oskar’s grandparents lived through the upheaval of World War 2, but his grandfather 's beloved, Anna, did not. Traumatized by the event, his grandfather turned mute as he could no longer speak of things that reminded him of Anna, who died in the Bombing of Dresden. Foer translates Thomas Schell Sr. 's thoughts, “I haven’t always been silent, I used to talk and talk and talk and talk, I couldn’t keep my mouth shut, the silence overtook me like a cancer” (16). The Bombing of Dresden was only a small part of the holocaust, but impacted the Schell 's lives forever. Loss Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close centers on a young boy and his ways of dealing with the loss of his relationship with his mother and the determination he once had to decode his father 's messages. At a very young age, Oskar Schell lost his father, and this led to the
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