F. Scott Fitzgerald 's The Great Gatsby

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The American Dream is defined as the idea that all citizens of the United States of America are able to have an equal chance to gain success, and to prosper through hard work and determination. The American Dream is the driving force of evolution in humanity. It allows the aspiration of being able to do astonishing things, and proffers them prosperity in life. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald delves into the American Dream and it’s demise. Fitzgerald focuses on the character of Jay Gatsby to materialize the false image that the American Dream created in the 1920’s. Gatsby is the protagonist of the novel, and is famous for throwing massive parties regardless of the secret life that he lives. The narrator, Nick Carraway, dives into…show more content…
After losing Daisy, Gatsby begins his search for the American Dream. Fitzgerald states that, The truth was that Jay Gatsby, of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God—a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that—and he must be about His Father’s business, the service of a vast, vulgar, and meretricious beauty. So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen year old boy would be likely to invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end (98). Nick uses a comparison between Gatsby and Jesus to highlight Gatsby’s recreation of himself. Gatsby transforms himself into what he envisions his life to be, creating a false persona in his chase of the American Dream. He hides behind Jay Gatsby, because James Gatz will not be able to achieve the American dream if he tries due to his background. Fitzgerald uses words like “truth”, “God”, “vulgar”, “meretricious”, and “faithful” to prove the lengths that Gatsby goes through to try to meet the American Dream. The initial time that Jay Gatsby is seen is when Nick Carraway spots him at the end of his dock. Nick watched Gatsby as, ...he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward—and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock (21). As Gatsby reaches out
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