Fdr Leadership Style Analysis

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Within the American government as described by the constitution, no president has true Bureaucratic Immunity. Defined by Williams (2015) as “The ability to make changes without first getting approval from managers or other parts of an organisation.” (p. 212) This is because the government is split into three branches, the executive, legislative and judicial. Checks and balances eliminate a consolidation of power. However in the beginning of his presidency, FDR had the next best thing, a strong democratic majority in the house and senate! This made it possible for him to make meaningful and lasting economic reform. However he was later slammed by the supreme court when some parts of the new deal where overruled. (“Franklin D. Roosevelt” 2016)…show more content…
293) Or in this case Japanese American citizens. In context of being president, it would also mean taking in consideration the long term effects of your policies and how it affects all Americans. The fourth role of management is leadership, which was definitely FDR’s strongest management skill. FDR’s aptitude for leadership can best be described by trait theory, defined by Williams (2015) as “a leadership theory that holds that effective leaders possess a similar set of traits.” (9. 290) Some examples of these traits are being tall, energetic and having a deep voice. It was said that FDR was six foot, two inches tall, charismatic and had a stern voice, which supports trait theory. However he did not stand much after the age of 39 when he was diagnosed with polio. (“Franklin Roosevelt as a Leader”…show more content…
Williams (2015) has defined this as “Leadership that creates a positive image of the future that motivates organizational members and provides direction for future planning and goal setting.” (p. 305) This was done on a national scale and conveyed with FDR’s famous fireside chats. This kept every American well informed and up to date on the progress being made by everyone working to end the recession. His visionary leadership style came from a strong sense of dedication as a public servant. Instead of spending his early years as a TV personality like certain other presidents, he served as senator representing New York state, assistant secretary of the Navy, vice presidential candidate, governor of New York and then the president. (“Franklin Roosevelt as a Leader”
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