Feminism In Hamlet

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The tragic play Hamlet is one of the most important plays written by Shakespeare in the Middle Ages and which has resonated greatly by the public and critics throughout the ages. This play has gone through three stages of development. It is derived from the story of the American historian of the thirteenth century (Saxo Graematics), who spoke about Hamlet and the story of his revenge. Shakespeare's version is more tragic and affected by the middle ages.
Although Shakespeare has been rated by some critics as a feminist, there are critics who argue that what Shakespeare wrote was to please men and what was said to be supportive of gender equality is not true. However, Shakespeare presents a single image of women in his literature, despite the variety of characters he presented. He views women as a constant source of evil and sin. This reflects the religious source of Adam's first sin based on female.
In Hamlet, two female models were presented: Gertrude, Hamlet's mother
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The existence of women in the midst of a patriarchal society that dominations the life through controlling women. They view them as properties not as human beings, so they their rights as individuals or giving them them freedom to choose. Shakespeare's ability as a great writer to portray feminine characters' psychological states in a patriarchal society makes the reader identify the real characters rather than the judgment of the society. Even when a powerful woman in England, who is Elizabeth I, controlled England from 1558 to 1603, women are still mistreated by men, silent, weak, subservient to men and lacking freedom to choose. Gertrude and Ophelia are the only two female characters of "Hamlet" by Shakespeare. These female characters struggle the same fact of being marginalized voices in their

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