Festival and Its Environment Impact

1576 Words Jul 28th, 2013 7 Pages
Festivals of India

Indian festivals are both colourful and extremely joyous. People enjoy the festivals with family and friends. The religious significance of the festivals too can hardly be denied. Here are some of the very popular festivals that take place throughout India. There are many festivals in India like Durga Puja,Navratri,Dussehra,Ganesh Chaturthi,Holi,Diwali,etc.
In India, festivals do not just offer people a temporary reprieve from their daily grind. Imbued with deep inner significance, each festival is a multifaceted celebration. The day on which a particular festival is celebrated has a special astrological significance, and certain observances on these days yield manifold benefits. That is why Indian festivals are marked
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Plaster is a man-made material, easier to mould, lighter and less expensive than clay. However, plaster is non-biodegradable, and insoluble in water. Moreover, the chemical paints used to adorn these plaster idols themselves contain heavy metals like mercury and cadmium, causing water pollution. Also, on immersion, non-biodegradable accessories that originally adorned the idol accumulate in the layers of sand on the beach.
Recently there have been new initiatives sponsored by some state governments to produce clay Ganesha idols.[15]
On the final day of the Ganesh festival thousands of plaster idols are immersed into water bodies by devotees. These increase the level of acidity in the water and the content of heavy metals.[16]
Holi
Holi is a spring festival celebrated as a festival of colours. It is a Hindu religious festival which has also become popular with people of other communities. Holi is of particular significance in the Braj region, which includes locations traditionally connected to the Lord Krishna: Mathura, Vrindavan, Nandgaon, Uttar Pradesh, and Barsana, which become tourist destinations during the season of Holi.[1] As per the Hindu calendar, Holi is celebrated on the Phalguna Purnima (Full Moon), which comes in February or March in the Gregorian Calendar.

Environmental Impact of Holi
An alleged environmental issue related