Essay about Fiction Analysis Hills Like White Elephants

765 Words Mar 26th, 2002 4 Pages
WC: 754

Title: Sacred Moments

Close interpretation of the story "Hills Like White Elephants" by Ernest Hemingway leads the reader to an issue that has plagued society for decades. Understanding of the human condition is unveiled in the story line, the main setting, and through the character representation. The main characters in the story are an American man and a female named Jig. The conflict about abortions is an issue that still faces society today. Architectural and atmospheric symbolisms are used to set the mood and outline the human condition. The love bond between the man and Jig is strong; however, the more powerful bond between Jig and her unborn child is sacred.
Many years ago our society was filled with moral and
…show more content…
The American is set on convincing Jig that there is no harm in what she is considering. He tries to calm Jig by telling her "We'll be fine afterwards, just like we were before"(24). Jig is not convinced. She is not as confident or as willing as the American to rush off into such a carefree decision. The luggage, covered with hotel labels, plays a significant part in understanding how Jig feels in regard to the decision that she had to make. She was obviously torn between remaining reckless and carefree and making a family with the man she loved. Jig reacts almost visibly in their conversation.
Building a social wall is the means to an end for Jig in the fight to make her decision. She is willing to do almost anything for the American but is blocked by her motherly instinct to protect her child. The American tells Jig "We can have everything"(24), "It's ours"(24), but she knows better. "No, it isn't. And once they take it away, you never get it back"(24) Jig tells him. The fact that she would be giving up a child is one thing, but the difficult decision for her at this point is giving up her ability to ever have children again. Trying desperately Jig pleads with the man, "Would you please please please please please please please stop talking?"(25).
The setting for the story really helps the reader to understand Hemingway's story line. Hemingway mimics the tension between the American and Jig with his use of the dry, hot, desert