Final Beverage : Non Alcoholic Beer

917 Words4 Pages
David Bohn Restaurant Operations Final Beverage Paper – Non-Alcoholic 10/9/2015 Non-Alcoholic Beer Non-alcoholic beer for the most part still has alcohol in it, .5 percent alcohol is the most common and yes there are some that have 0.0 percent alcohol but they are more expensive to produce and the flavor is greatly reduced. There are countries like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Qatar, just to name a few, where you would find the 0.0 percent alcoholic beer because any type of alcohol consumption is strictly prohibited. In these countries they have strict punishments for the consumption of alcohol, such as, whippings, incarceration and deportation. The Middle East countries consume one third of all non-alcoholic beer produced.…show more content…
The beers produced during prohibition did produce a new market that exists today, the light or lite beer market. Many people developed a new love for the lighter flavored beer, as well as lowered carb beer. Process of Production Non-alcoholic beer starts out with the same process as regular beer, processing the mash, boiling the wart, adding the hops and then the fermentation, at this point it beer with alcohol in it and you could start bottling it for sale. The next process is to take the alcohol out of it, and this is done by heating it. Alcohol has a much lower boiling point then water, which is 212 degrees Fahrenheit, alcohol boils off at 173 degrees Fahrenheit. They have to keep it heated until the beer reaches an “ABV” or Alcohol by Volume of .5 percent, but the result of heating the beer is that you lose flavor. Another process can be used to reduce flavor loss and that is by heating the alcohol under a vacuum which allows you to boil the beer at 120 degrees Fahrenheit. There is a vacuum process which does allow you to heat at 50 degrees Fahrenheit, but this process is too expensive for most large brewers to still make a profit. Probably the best way to produce a non-alcoholic beer with minimal loss of flavor is through the
Open Document