Final Bus501

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Doing Business in South Africa For years, South Africa’s Afrikaner Nationalist Party was conducting all types of racial attacks that were raising ethical issues. Along with the South African government, they reshaped racial laws and regulations, continuing with violence against blacks. Nonwhites outnumbered whites by about 5 to 1. Violence consisted of the Sharpeville massacre, the Soweto Street death demonstration, and the death of black leader who was in police custody. Through such acts, South Africa’s direct investment rose dramatically. In 1960, the Pan-African Congress allowed blacks to be free of passbooks, which listed their name, birth place, tribal affiliation, arrests, contained their picture, serial number, and a receipt…show more content…
Although whites held superior positions within South Africa, they were outnumbered by blacks, yet they still managed to overpower them. Another incident that rose eyebrows was the death of Stephen Biko, the leader of the South African Student Organization. “In the black freedom struggles in the Republic of South Africa in the 1960s and 1970s, launching of protests by black students also marked a turning point and the onset of a new phase of the larger anti-apartheid movement” (Franklin, 2003). His death became world news. Accused of placing him to rest were the Port Elizabeth security police. They brutally beat Biko and chained him to a gate as if he was in a crucifixion and did not seek medical care for him until the next day. References Franklin, V. P. (2003). Patterns of Student Activism at Historically Black Universities in the United States and South Africa, 1960-1977. Journal of African American History. Retrieved on May 1, 2015 from http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=41&sid=b82c7a17-4c12-40c4-9871-41eb6a185004%40sessionmgr110&hid=115. Kline, J. M. (1997). Doing Business in South Africa: Seeking Ethical Parameters for Business and Governmental Responsibilities. Case Study for the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs. Routh, G. (1965). African Nemesis. Retrieved on May 1, 2015 from

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