First Amendment: Protection of Privacy

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As a private citizen, my privacy is very important, especially when in this new digital age; governmental agencies will use that information against you if they have a probable cause to. However, we are protected under the First and Fourth amendment, which gives us rights to speech, to drink or smoke in our homes without governmental intrusion. But when those rights are violated, we have the options to dispute those actions and if not satisfied with the results we can take it to the courts. But in order to do this we must limit what we say or do, in order to prevent these agencies from trying to impinge on our rights of liberty. What this does is give the agencies the right to look into our lives, but are we actually giving them the …show more content…
Des Moines 393 U.S. 503, 1969, the Court ruled that the First Amendment applied to public schools, and school officials could not censor student speech unless it disrupted the educational process. Because wearing a black armband was not disruptive, the Court held that the First Amendment protected the right of students to wear one. Since then Tinker remains a frequently-cited Court precedent. In Morse v. Frederick, the Supreme Court will decide whether Tinker remains good law, and whether the First Amendment continues to protect the right of students to express controversial views that are not disruptive but may disagree with official school policy. (393 U.S. 503, 1969)
Notes of importance to those that post to the different media sites know your company Facebook policies, understand that If your statements will cause disruption in your workplace, then don’t post it. In this digital age everyone is being monitored in one way or another. Society needs to understand their Constitutional laws, and understand what the meaning of “expectation of privacy”, what does this mean to you? Or what does it mean to others? Different governmental entities will use your friends to turn against you, so that they can gather evidence of

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