Five Dimensions of Personality and Their Correlation with Job Performance

2733 WordsMar 12, 200611 Pages
The accurate definition of personality has been a point of discussion amongst many different philosophers within many different disciplines since the beginning of civilization. Personality can be defined as "the relatively stable set of psychological characteristics that influences the way an individual interacts with his or her environment" (Johns , 1996: 75). Personality has a rocky history within the workplace and organization behavior because of measurement problems. There is now a renewed interest because of the emphasis on service jobs with customer contact, concerns about ethics and integrity and contemporary interest in teamwork and cooperation. All of these point to the potential contribution of personality. Trait theory is…show more content…
Extroversion also is sometimes referred to as social adaptability. Extroversion declines after the age 30 in women but does not change much in men. One of the biggest increases is agreeableness – the tendency to be warm, understanding, generous and helpful occurs between the age of 30 and 40. The bases of neuroticism are levels of anxiety and volatility. Within these bounds, neuroticism is "a dimension of personality defined by stability and low anxiety at one end as opposed to instability and high anxiety at the other end" (Pervin, 1989, p. G-7). According to theorists, personality can change in old age but it only happens when an individuals experiences senility or another mental decline. With the five factors placed on sliding scales, it becomes only an exercise in determination (through experimentation, survey, and interview) to associate various human characteristics with one or more of the five factors. Strong correlates quickly become obvious, and as trends develop it becomes possible to assign very precise descriptions about people via their placement on the sliding scales related with the five factors. Certainly, it seems likely that these results can be used to extrapolate many behavioral characteristics, including such dependent traits as financial
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