Food Safety, Food, And Food Choice At Mcdonalds

1167 WordsOct 21, 20155 Pages
A combination of tender, juicy breast meat grilled to perfection, served with crisp iceberg lettuce, juicy tomato and vinaigrette dressing on a toasted whole grain bun. This represents a low-calorie food choice at McDonalds, an example of how Public Health practices continue to influence how we eat. Throughout history, advances in food science and technology have played a pivotal role in making food safer and healthier for an ever evolving society. Today, we have much greater access to an abundant, diverse food supply that is largely safe, convenient, nutritious, flavorful, and less costly than ever before. This access to such food is largely because of Public Health advances that make food not only safer but also healthier. From the…show more content…
We often almost reflexively turn to the back of these food items, where the ingredients and nutrition label are located as we have become more aware of what we eat. The ingredients label is important because we must know what we are eating. It also helps us avoid certain ingredients if we have a food allergy or if we are following a diet. The nutrition label provides key information such as percent daily values. These values listed on the labels give us a good idea which foods are high or low in various essential nutrients. Food was not always safe and nutritious. Imagine going to the local fast food restaurant and after eating your meal you start to vomit, develop abdominal cramp, nausea, and diarrhea as a result of your meal being undercooked. In 1993, Brianne Kiner, nine years old at the time, dined at the Jack in the Box in Redmond. She ate a burger. On Wednesday, January 13, Brianne was admitted to Seattle Children’s Hospital. She had begun suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms. She developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) as a result, she began to bleed from every orifice of her body. Brianne slipped into a coma, during which doctors removed her large intestine and hooked her heart, lungs, and kidneys up to machines to keep them functioning. Brianne was expected to die, but eventually emerged from the coma, and began the slow process of recovery. Many effects of her infection were permanent, including diabetes, asthma, brain damage and future
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