For A Society Of Any Kind To Survive It Must Deal Successfully

1491 WordsJan 27, 20176 Pages
For a society of any kind to survive it must deal successfully with an onslaught of diverse tasks and difficult decisions relating to the well-being of the community. Twin Oaks is a multi faceted and diverse community of well organized and skilled members with an emphasis on egalitarianism and income-sharing. It is a thorough assessment on the viability of an alternative society and it proves the effectiveness of self-sustainability as an eco-village. Twin Oaks, to me, serves as an example of a successful “Utopia”. This can be seen through careful examination of each discipline and facet of society in Twin Oaks and how each relates to the success of the community and the individual. An almost uncountable number of variables exist that…show more content…
Everybody must do dishes once a week. Rigidity in most cases eventually meets with unfortunate stress fracturing, but flexibility is the unique ability to adapt to changing circumstances on the fly helping to mitigate stress. It can be argued that the workforce is the foundation of any society and with their success or failure comes the success or failure of the society as a whole. Thus giving depth of meaning and power to the idea that a happy working class is a happy society! For a work force to run smoothly, however, there must be some system of delegation and planning available to help coordinate activities and answer questions. In a typical society this falls into the hands of elected officials, representatives, and policy makers who through complex systems of voting for, writing, and sponsoring bills, enact laws and regulations as frameworks of operation for the rest of society. Twin oaks however, does things differently. Instead of elected officials, and complex hierarchy’s of government, a single “Planner” is elected for 18 months. He or she is the vehicle for decision making but does not go unchecked. There exist, in Twin Oaks, a system of appeals by which a member can challenge the decision of a Planner if the decision is deemed unworthy or unreasonable. The first step, however, is to simply confront the planner and ask for a reconsideration. If a reconsideration is denied a member can assemble a managers council who will take a vote to overturn a
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