Ford Model T: the Idea That Started a Revolution

4653 Words Nov 24th, 2012 19 Pages
Ford Model T: The Idea That Started a Revolution

Nathan McCourt
Mr. Todd Willems
20th Century History
19 December 2011

Table of Contents

Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3
The “Assembly Line”………………………………………………………………………………………………………………4
Keeping the Relationship……………………………………………………………………………………………………….6
The Ethos of Mass Production………………………………………………………………………………………………..8
Industries Built off an Industry………………………………………………………………………………………………11
Transforming America Yesterday and Today…………………………………………………………………………13
Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….15
Works Cited…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..17

Nathan McCourt
Mr. Willems
20th Century History
19 December 2011
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“With one workman doing a complete job he could turn out from thirty-five to forty pieces in a nine-hour day, or about twenty minutes to an assembly. What he did alone was then spread into twenty-nine operations; that cut down the assembly time to thirteen minutes” (Ford, 45). Ford had nearly cut the production time of one Ford Model T in half, allowing for more automobiles to be produced in a day. The Ford Motor Company was able to produce 150 Ford Model Ts every day and eventually reached nearly 10,000 Model Ts a day by 1925 (Sandler, 21). Each worker would contribute his skill at assembling a single part of the Model T, and once he completed his task he would pass the Model T on to the next worker in line along the assembly line, similar to the meat production factory in which Ford envisioned his idea. His idea soon caught on and became an idealistic way to mass produce products in America which soon caught on to other industries and continued to inspire the ways Americans would produce goods even to this day. The Ford Motor Company’s success with the assembly line caught the eyes of many industries that made products that required assembly, and because the assembly line was so successful it made a great awareness in finding its way into other factories during the 1910s and even today. Factories that assembled products like textiles, firearms, and bicycles began to be
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