Frankenstein, By Mary Shelley

1376 WordsApr 27, 20156 Pages
Frankenstein could be compared to everyday life for the average human because we tend to have to live up to a standard of “Normal” so those that don’t understand us won’t have to fear us. The story of Frankenstein could have a deeper meaning that most readers have neglected to catch over the years. Maybe the story of Frankenstein was loosely based on the emotions of Mary Shelley from similar situations she was forced to experience throughout her lifetime. One of her most famous quotes show evidence that she sometimes felt like she was not ordinary in the eyes of most. “The act of writing may compose the mind… but the boiling of the soul, and quake of the heart, that precede transcend all the sufferings which tame the spirit tame spirits…show more content…
She was younger than he was by ten years but they ended up meeting each other through her father. Percy was a dropout but he helped her father out with his Children’s Book Enterprise; therefore he was highly trusted by her father. Her father found joy with the thought of the two making each other happy and being head over heels for each other Percy, Like Mary, was the furthest thing from what society considered to be normal at that period of time. “Unfettered by popular opinion, the young atheist neither ate meat nor drank alcohol.” (Qwiklit). Both seemed to move to the beat of their own drum, this may have been what attracted them to one another. They seemed to be a gothic couple’s dream come true, so it was only right that they took the next step. Percy asked Mary’s father William Godwin for her hand in union and was rejected for reasons unknown. Young dumb and in love the Shelley’s refused to take no for an answer. They promptly left London and eloped France without her father’s consent. Though it sounds irresponsible on their part this was probably one of the best things to happen to the Shelley’s, especially marry. “Mary Godwin, as she was known before her elopement with percy Bysshe Shelley, was naturally precocious, but William’s stature as a public intellectual permitted her to access hundreds of books most could not retrieve, and allowed her to encounter some of the greatest minds in the Western World before she had even reached puberty. She
Open Document