Frankenstein Essay

701 Words 3 Pages
In her novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley explores a wide range of themes concerning human nature through the thoughts and actions of two main characters and a host of others. Two themes are at the heart of the story, the most important being creation, but emphasis is also placed on alienation from society. These two themes are relevant even in today’s society as technology brings us ever closer to Frankenstein’s fictional achievement.
First, let’s examine the alienation from society suffered by Frankenstein’s monster. The cause of his ostracism was his horrific physical appearance. It was so bad that people would not even allow him the chance to speak or get to know the person behind the hideous face. Shelley is criticizing the
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Perhaps less than revenge, the monster only wanted someone to know what it is like to be alone and denied love.
This brings us the theme of creation, which really contains smaller ‘sub-themes.’ There is the relationship between the creator and his creation as well as the question of whether or not the created owes his allegiance to society. What should the relationship between Victor and the monster have been? In Shelley’s criticism of all who were disgusted by his looks, Victor would be in the wrong for having shunned the monster. It was his fault the monster existed, so he should have taken it in and shown it compassion. As the creator, he owes his creation the basic means to a happy life. As for the monster, in turn for his creator’s gift of life and happiness, he would pledge loyalty. But because Frankenstein dropped his end of the contract from the start, all bets were off and the monster tried to be as diplomatic as possible about the whole affair. This goes back to the alienation theme starting with Victor’s abandoning of the monster.
What about the monster’s role in society? As a man’s creation, did the monster owe any debt to society or have a right to be part of it? He did not choose to be born into it, but he was forced to seek refuge in the world upon being abandoned. He knew that they would never accept him and would have never needed their acceptance if Victor had accepted…