Frankenstein and 1984: Cautionary Tales

2070 Words Aug 4th, 2013 9 Pages
1984 and Frankenstein: Cautionary Tales
George Orwell and Mary Shelley use their works as precautions to potential disasters in society. As Orwell is warning humanity of the hazards of totalitarian rule, Shelley is forewarning the danger of science becoming too powerful for mankind’s own good. In 1984, Winston fully changes as a character from despising the Party to loving Big Brother. If it was not for the strong pressure to conform inflicted upon him by the Party, Winston would never have gained the love for Big Brother. In Frankenstein, Victor shifts from a child dreaming of recognition and fame for discovering the secret of life to a twisted man with an obsession with getting revenge on his own creation. His act of creation results in
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The effort the two lovers must put in to see each other is unthinkable, as they must avoid telescreens and microphones almost everywhere they turn. When Mr. Charrington allows them to use his room without a telescreen, they take full advantage of it. Seeing as Winston is still married to his wife and sexual acts are illegal, Julia and Winston defy the Party in more ways than one. Winston has changed from full obedience to the Party to defying it due to his outsized amount of hatred for Big Brother. Julia and Winston engage in negative talk about the Party, which puts them subject to arrest.
Believing that O’Brien is a member of the Brotherhood and he too is opposed to the Party, Julia and Winston pay him a visit at his apartment. O’Brien tells the two that they must be willing to lose their own lives in order to take down Big Brother; however, when he asks if they would be willing to betray one another, they refuse. Winston’s hatred for Big Brother has accumulated so much that he is now willing to die solely for the sake of taking down the Party. At the start of the novel, Winston could not stand the thought of his own death. The thought haunted him, and he was not prepared for that to happen. As the story progresses and Winston is being oppressed in more and more ways, he despises the Party more than ever, and eventually is