Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

1032 Words5 Pages
Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner Freakonomics brings together many combinations of thoughts that one wouldn’t find relevant in companionship. The two authors discuss comparisons that are so off the wall, that you almost question reading the book; however, that is the reason many read the book in the first place. The authors Levitt and Dubner compare in one chapter of Freakonomics the reason why drug dealers live with their moms. Throughout this chapter, the authors discuss questions about why intelligent people sometimes do not ask questions that people really care about, advertising and surveys, and why, in general, do drug dealers still live with their…show more content…
Therefore, I find that throughout this topic of discussion from Freakonomics, the author’s use examples that help clarify the reader’s curiosity to why such a question should be asked in the first place, and thus, setting the reader’s mind to think about the following topics in the chapter. The second point I aim to prove, is the author’s use of advertising and examples of misused surveys to prepare the reader for the chapter’s topic. The evidence in this section is based on an example of Mitch Snyder, who was an advocate for homeless people, a Listerine advertising campaign, and the Atlanta Police Department’s instantly cleaner image to prepare for the 1996 Olympic Games. All three of these examples leave the reader feeling like they have just wasted 15 minutes reading something that does not even pertain to the chapter’s content. Levitt and Dubner use Mitch Snyder’s case as an example to show how surveys and statistics, when given in error, provide the media with an informational field day. Snyder was an activist for homeless people who testified before Congress about the enormous size of the current homeless rate.Their use of this example is hard to understand, because sufficient evidence is not given to the reader as to why this example is important. The section on advertising seems to take the reader away from the chapter’s context for a while, confuse them, and then land them back to

More about Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Open Document