Freedom of Speech: Missouri Knights of the Ku Klux Klan v. Kansas City

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The articles "Freedom of Speech: Missouri Knights of the Ku Klux Klan v. Kansas City" and "Freedom of Religion: Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association" both engage in conflicts pertaining to the First Amendment in the Bill of Rights. "Freedom of Speech: Missouri Knights of the Ku Klux Klan v. Kansas City" is an article about the KKK's attempt to spread their beliefs through a public access cable television channel. Dennis Mahon and Allan Moran, both of the KKK, asked to be broadcasted on air in 1987, and the whole situation led to a major problem. The…show more content…
Reverend Cleaver was a notable man and was also one the victims of a KKK cross burning on his property. The Kansas City area was one of the most segregated areas in the country and there had been other continuing incidents of graffiti and harassment to black members of the community. Reverend Cleaver believed that the KKK should not be granted the ability to exercise their freedom of speech because they were a "terrorist organization" and murderers of thousands of people across the country. The only solution to keeping the show off the air was to prove that the "Klansas City Kable" would trigger violence in the neighborhood. Because none of the episodes of "Klansas City Kable" had been created yet, Reverend Cleaver had to turn to another idea. He presented the idea of eliminating the public access channel altogether. Finally, on June 16, 1988, the city council of Kansas City voted 9 to 2 to drop the public access channel. Surprisingly, one of the two votes against the idea was Joanne Collins. She got a lot of attention because she was black. She believed the freedom of speech should not be withheld from anyone, even if it was the KKK. This event caused much debate and officials battered over what the First Amendment stood for. Because the public access channel was dropped, Pevar filed a suit in federal district court on behalf of the KKK: Missouri Knights of

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