From Servitude to Freedom in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Essay examples

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From Servitude to Freedom in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte's novel, Jane Eyre, skillfully reveals that Jane, the protagonist, has the qualities of endurance, valor, and vitality, yet she is refused self-contentment by the confined society in which she lives. Not only is this work a love story, but it is the tale of a young orphaned girl and her struggle for love and independence. Through the various environments Bronte provides, Jane oscillates between education and containment and also between freedom and servitude. Beginning at Gateshead, Jane has her first experience of containment in dealing with the Reeds. John Reed blatantly smothers Jane's space by treating her like a slave, and Mrs. Reed enslaves her in every way. Mrs.…show more content…
Mr. Brocklehurst preaches to Jane about sin and the Bible but Jane refuses to say what he wants to hear. Her first taste of rebellion continues in her encounter with Mrs. Reed. Jane says, "I am glad you are no relation of mine. I will never call you aunt again as long as I live. I will never come to see you when I am grown up; and if anyone asks me how I liked you, and how you treated me, I will say the very thought of you makes me sick, and that you treated me with miserable cruelty"(Bronte 30). Jane has the courage to stand up once and for all to her aunt. She has an unexplainable feeling inside, "the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph...it seemed as if an invisible bond had burst,"(Bronte 30), and this feeling is the cause of Jane's breaks from containment later on in the novel. Jane uses the last break away from her restraints at Gateshead and moves on to Lowood Academy. Lowood is an "institution" that greets her with indigent conditions although she has escaped the wrath of her aunt. The routine of her life at Lowood in itself is a containing device in Jane's struggle with her lessons, hemming muslin for Mrs. Smith, and observing Miss Scatcherd's humiliation of Jane's friend Helen Burns. Helen tries to exert her influence on Jane but Jane, Helen's foil character, still refuses to submit to authority. Mr. Brocklehurst forces Jane at one point to stand on a stool for a half hour for breaking her slate and he

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