Essay on Fundamentalism and Religion

785 Words 4 Pages
Fundamentalism and Religion

For a vast majority, the term “fundamentalism” evokes images of hostage crises, embassies under siege, hijackings, and suicide bombers. But these images hardly present a comprehensive picture. People in the west associate fundamentalism with Islam, this is indeed a mistaken belief. Fundamentalism is defined as " the affirmation of religious authority as holistic and absolute, admitting of neither criticism nor reduction; it is expressed through the collective demand that specific creedal and ethical dictates derived from scripture be publicly recognized and legally enforced ." (Lawrence)

Therefore the essence of fundamentalist belief is doctrinal confirmity, of
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Furthermore, Zionists mark yet another episode of Jewish Fundamentalism. Zionism ( sect of Judaism) is based heavily upon religious tradition linking the Jewish people to the Land of Israel (their promised land), and for that reason they seek massive deportation of Arabs by force.

The most daunting example of fundamentalism is found in Christianity. Nicolas Copernicus and Galileo Galilei were famous astronomers who led to a breakthrough in astronomy by promulgating the heliocentric model of the Solar System (the Earth goes round the Sun, rather than the Sun going round the Earth)[2]. Though has model was logically coherent and later accepted to be valid, they were persecuted by the Catholic Church because their system was in conflict with the Bible. In addition, crusades epitomize Christian fundamentalism. Crusades were a series of military campaigns, sanctioned by the Catholic church that took place during the 11th through 13th centuries. Originally, they were Roman Catholic endeavors to capture the Holy Land from the Muslims, but some were directed against other Europeans, such as the Fourth Crusade against Constantinople, the Albigensian Crusade against the Cathars of southern France and the Northern Crusades. People were forced to convert to Christianity, if they refused, they were put to death[3].Thus Crusades were in part an outlet for an intense religious piety
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