Gandhi 's Early Self Identification

1690 WordsMay 12, 20177 Pages
Early days Mahatma Gandhi was the primary leader of India’s independence movement and also the architect of a form of non-violent civil disobedience that would influence the world. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, popularly known as Gandhi, was born to Putlibai on October 2nd, 1869 in Porabandar,India. His father, Karamchand Uttamchand Gandhi served as the Diwan chief minister of Porbandar state. The Indian classics, especially the stories of and king Harishchandra, had a great impact on Gandhi in his childhood. Gandhi 's early self-identification with truth and love as supreme values is traceable to these epic characters. On 21 January 1879, Mohandas entered the local district school in Rajkot, not far from his home. At school, he was…show more content…
Mavji Dave, a brahmin priest and family friend, advised Gandhi that he should qualify as a barrister in London, after which he would be certain to achieve the diwanship. Initially, Putlibai did not want her youngest son to leave India and travel across the ocean, thereby losing his caste according to believes at that time. But somehow Gandhi convinced and got the permission to leave. On 10 August 1888, Gandhi left Porbandar for Bombay (Mumbai). Upon arrival in the port, he was met by the head of the Modh Bania community, who had known Gandhi 's family for a while. Having learned of Gandhi 's plans, he and other elders warned Gandhi that he would be excommunicated if he did not remain in India. Gandhi did not change his intentions to leave for England, therefore being daclared and outcast. While in London his mother died, but his family kept the news from him. South Africa Gandhi was 24 when he arrived in South Africa in 1893 to work as a legal representative for the Muslim Indian Traders based in the city of Pretoria. He spent 21 years in South Africa, where he developed his political views, ethics and political leadership skills. Indians in South Africa included wealthy Muslims, who employed Gandhi as a lawyer, and impoverished Hindu indentured labourers with very limited rights. He believed that he understood India better by getting to know and leading Indians in South Africa. He faced several challenges in South Africa. He majorly faced the
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