Gender Differences Of Managerial Communications : Fact Or Folk Linguistics?

1991 WordsJul 3, 20158 Pages
“Gender Differences in Managerial Communications: Fact or Folk-Linguistics?” A response to Smeltzer and J. Werbel’s study “Gender Differences in Managerial Communications: Fact or Folk-Linguistics?” Devin Lowe MGMT 647: Organizational Behavior and Development Article Summary “Gender Differences in Managerial Communication: Fact or Folk-Linguistics” seeks to test the qualitative and stylistic differences that have been purported to exist between genders. The authors question the credibility of previous studies and state numerous times that there is a high likelihood that these earlier studies were subject to the bias of their researchers. The assertion is that many conclusions are opinion based and speculative according to personal experience rather than quantifiable data. Using a sample group of 2nd year MBA students and their writing examples, the authors rated the communication based on 16 dimensions. Final results showed that there are significant differences between distinct managerial communication samples, but not between genders. Traditional thoughts on women’s communications show a notably stereotypical demonstration of ineffective communication characteristics. These characteristics include verbosity, constrained vocabulary, and indirect requests (Thorne and Henley, 1975). The authors at this point question the validity of the stereotypes in regard to writing style and quality. They assert that folk-linguistics, or the common beliefs about a

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