Gender, Sexuality And Sexual Identity

3292 WordsJul 20, 201614 Pages
Ryan_Alicia_18789106_EDC111_Ass2 Are issues of diversity represented fairly, realistically and accurately or problematically in Australian schools in regards to issues of gender, sexuality and sexual identity. For students to thrive in their learning experience, schools need to provide a safe nurturing environment, free from harassment, aggression, violence and bullying. Homophobia and discrimination can have a significant negative impact on Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual and Transgender (LGBT) students as well as children from same-sex families, especially in the schooling years ("Sexual Diversity", 2016). While the Sex Discrimination Act (1984) and the NSW Anti-Discrimination Act (1977) dictate sexual diversity laws that schools are required…show more content…
These inequities are presented in many ways. Gender stereotyping can advocate prejudice and discrimination and can place constraints on people 's lives. Stereotyping can pressure individuals to make choices that conform to society 's definition of normal (Jennett, 2013). From birth, children are exposed to gender stereotypes, such as pink is for girls and blue is for boys (Peters, 2014). As children grow, society as well at consumerism, dictate which toys, games, books and clothes are appropriate gender representations. By the time children start to make their choices, most will realise what is expected of them, and act accordingly. Other children will defy these constraints, and in turn may feel as though, not conforming to these expectations, is wrong (Jennett, 2013). According to O 'Brien (2013), children as young as three years old can anticipate their parent 's ideas on gender appropriate toys, and have the ability to choose accordingly. McNaughton (2000) argues that children obtain an identity on a social basis, through a course of observation and engagement. Children injudiciously absorb what is presented to them. In the case of equality in schooling, children uncritically learn understandings of gender, race and class that teachers, peers and parents offer them. Siraj-Blatchford & Clarke (2004) argue that children can only learn to be accepting, and challenge prejudicial generalisations, acquire inclusiveness and
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