Gender and Development Theories, Wid, Wad and Gad, Their Strengths and Weaknesse

1971 Words Nov 24th, 2011 8 Pages
INVESTING IN AFRICA’S FUTURE FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

Name: Chupical Shollah Manuel

Reg Number: R 086305 HU

Lecturer: Musvosvi, E (Ms)

Course: Gender and Development (HSO 306)

Question: Briefly discuss the following theories and show the strengths and weaknesses of each approach to Gender Development; WID, WAD and GAD.

Gender relates to the social constructions and relations between men and women and it does not simply look at maleness or femaleness. Development is a multidimensional concept but in general it entails social upward mobility and empowerment but not limited to this. In studying gender relations and development it is of great importance to look at
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Baserup (1970) suggested that women needed to reduce the work loads they had so that they take part in education, projects which will also extend their power in the economy. In addition, Baserup pointed out that women have to receive credit facilities for greater economic projects. For example, Baserup echoed the mechanization of “female farming’ in African women farmers and revolutionarize traditional forms of agriculture for productive efficiency extracted from Schech and Haggis (2000). Rogers (1980) also suggested for a complete overhand of male attitudes against women. Rogers explicitly challenged this in her survey of the FAO institutional arrangement. She concluded that no women were found in field officers in technical division. Rogers (1980) therefore, concluded that women were not only excluded from planning and decision making but were being ignored and overlooked. Furthermore, households were assumed to be male headed which also generalized women as housewives (Rogers 1980:66 in Schech and Haggis, 2000). This shows that women’s work was regarded as non- work due to male bias. However, the WID approach agitated for equity, empowerment, efficiency and equal participation of women in existing structures.

The WID approach had so many deficiencies. Firstly, it remained vastly within the modernization theories. It failed to account for the objective problems which led women