General Culture And Business Etiquette. The Culture In

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General Culture and Business Etiquette The culture in Singapore could be described as authoritarian, pragmatic and rational due to the types of cultures that reside there. Although the main business language is English, there are some important customs to take note of before traveling to, or doing business with, Singapore. The main cultural traditions in Singapore are linked to India, China, and Malaysia, and Singaporeans are known to be loyal business partners with a strong trade foundation in the competitive Asian market. (Kwintessential) Establishing relationships will be important in the success of a business in Singapore, and you may come across different cultural customs from each of the communities. Business meetings with Malay…show more content…
By showing respect through customs, you’re providing an example of your business etiquette. While this is just a short list of customs to take note of, further, more in depth- research should be piloted before confidently conducting foreign business. Political Situation The Republic of Singapore is governed by a parliamentary republic with The Constitution of Singapore as their supreme law. They have a nominated president as head of state, an appointed prime minister as head of government, and appointed cabinet positions which are responsible for government policies. (Factbook) Their power structure is highly centralized, featuring a top-down appointment style; rather than electing most offices. When the President gets elected by the people, the President appoints a Prime Minister, who then appoints the cabinet. The Prime Minister is the leader of the Parliament, which acts as the country’s legislature. The People’s Action Party has dominated politics in Singapore since their independence from Malaysia in 1965. (BBC) Currently the country’s political system has been in the news for evolving into more than one dominant political party. The 2006 elections included three main opposition parties: The Singapore Democratic Alliance, The Singapore Democratic Party, and the Worker’s Party. The Education Minister, Ong Ye Kung, recently stated that “a multi-party system [in Singapore] could slow down
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