German Unification Essay

2783 Words Jan 3rd, 2011 12 Pages
Germany unification

Why?

Growing ties between the two Germany’s and a certain revival of a sense of German national identity preceded reunification during the 1980s. With the decline of the USSR and the end of the cold war and the fall of the Berlin wall allowed for German unification in 1990s.

When? How?

On October 3rd 1990 GDR and FRG were formally united.

German reunification posed the challenge of introducing new markets to an economy with none. The formerly communist German Democratic Republic (East Germany) joined the Federal Republic of Germany (west Germany) It was part of the dramatic demise of communism in Europe as well as a significant event for economic and political reasons.

It occurred at a time when the
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These huge investments gave East Germany the highest growth in Europe.

CONSENSUS??

CHANCELLOR post unification

Kohls prediction that any economic difficulties of unification would be quickly overcome was proved false, no surprise that this disappointment was widely expressed in both the east and West Germany.
The government faced a whole range of problems requiring a new style of political leadership.

Four areas which the role of chancellor was affected.

First – Strength of party system was eroded, weakening the supportive infrastructure the chancellor depends on.

Secondly – Intensification of distributional conflict makes the politics of allocation harder to manager.

Thirdly – Pressures on federal sustem add complexity to the policy making environment.

Fourthly – Germanys new foreign policy responsibilities heavy burden on the chancellor.

Chancellor and party system • Striking features of unification was the way the existing west germany party system was successfully grafted onto the east. Avoiding unstable coalitions and the need to deal with different party systems in the two parts of Germany. • Although it seems the chancellor faces no greater difficulties than those of managing the coalition and in dealing with his own party than he did in the past, his problems although largely the same have intensified. • Chancellors from both major
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