Getting to Yes: Negotiation Agreement without Giving In. (2nd Ed) Written by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton.

1257 Words6 Pages
This book is about negotiations and is based on the Harvard Negotiation Project. This is written in APA format.

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

In cooperation, Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton authored the book, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, to educate readers on how to become better, more effective negotiators. They start with describing their four principles for effective negotiation: People, Interests, Options, and Criteria. In addition, they describe three common obstacles to negotiation - when the other party is more powerful, what if they won't play, and when the other party uses dirty tricks - and discuss ways to overcome those obstacles. They also emphasize that all
…show more content…
When the Other Party Is More Powerful

Negotiation is hard to accomplish when there are differences in power. To overcome this, the authors suggest ways for the weaker party to overcome these differences in power. They suggest not using bottom lines. The bottom line is what the party anticipates as the worst acceptable outcome, and most parties decide in advance to reject any proposal below that line. The authors also argue that having already committed to a bottom line inhibits inventiveness in generating options. The alternative to the bottom line is that the weaker party should know their best alternative to a negotiated agreement (BATNA). Knowing the BATNA will enable the weaker party to utilize all of their assets and understand their minimum acceptable requirements for an agreement. Instead of allowing the stronger party to reject anything less than their bottom line, the weaker party should reject any agreement that would leave them worse off than their BATNA. The authors state that the one with the better BATNA is actually the stronger party.

What if They Won't Play

Sometimes the other side refuses to play the negotiation game. They refuse to budge from their demands, attack the other party's proposals, and only seek agreements for their own self-interest. There are three approaches for dealing with negotiators that refuse to negotiate. First, concentrate on the merits. Second, utilize "negotiation jujitsu" to bring the other party in line.

    More about Getting to Yes: Negotiation Agreement without Giving In. (2nd Ed) Written by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton.

      Open Document