Gettysburg Movie Historical Analysis

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With Hollywood producers jumping all over the idea of making historical wars and battles come to life on the big screen, many times fabricated and over-the-top details are added to enhance the overall plots. Keeping this in mind, I analyzed the movie Gettysburg, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, for historical accuracies. The battle of Gettysburg was the bloodiest battle in American history, many movies have been made to re-enact the horrors that unraveled within those days; however, many of them are incorrect. The movie Gettysburg, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, seems to be mostly accurate with the historical events. The defense of Little Round Top was a pivotal moment within the battle of Gettysburg, the winner of this skirmish would decide…show more content…
Vincent says, “Well, all right. I place you here. Put your colors here, and set your regiment to the left of this line. The rest of the brigade will form on your right. Understood?” (Gettysburg). While explosions from canons of the Confederate army go off and are nearly missing the 20th Maine Vincent says, “This is the left of the Union line. You are to hold this ground at all costs!” (Brann). Chamberlain then rushes to get his men set up and ready for a fight they’ll never forget. In the scene, he speaks of setting the line down Cemetery Ridge, with further research Brann explains that this set up formed an inverted fish hook to prevent the Confederates from infiltrating their left side (Brann). Chamberlain also keeps referring to his regiment as the extreme left flank which Brann confirms in his article. Brann refers to Chamberlain’s war log, “…his regiment was the first in line, but it actually took up its position last, curving its line back around to the east and forming the Union Army’s extreme left flank” (Brann). During the scene of Chamberlain’s set up of his regiment, he is accompanied by Major Homer R. Stoughton’s 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters. Brann elaborates that the sharpshooters were , “…armed with .52-caliber breechloading rifles . These sharpshooters’ skirmishing abilities were unequaled in the…show more content…
This is the main attack for which the 20th Maine regiment has been preparing for. During this clash, there are multiple waves that the regiment has to defend against. The director is trying to convey a point to the audience concerning the sheer numbers of the Confederate army by visually creating multiple wave attacks. The 20th Maine regiment is also a massive army especially with the extra help given delivered by, “… 120 three-year enlistees from the 2nd Maine Infantry were marched under guard into the regimental area of the 20th Maine. The 2nd Maine men were in a state of mutiny and refused to fight…” (Brann). For the production sake of the film, only six men could represent the historically accurate number of 120 men. In the film, Chamberlain talked to these men, saying, “Any of you fellas care to join us, any man who joins us now there will be no court-marshal” (Gettysburg). The director is trying to make it seem like this bit of help is substantially aiding the 20th regiment without having to cast the massive numbers of people. In the article, “The Battle of Gettysburg”, it tells more about the numbers, explaining how, “On the second day of battle, the Union defended a fishhook-shaped range of hills and ridges south of Gettysburg with around 90,000 soldiers. Confederates essentially wrapped around the Union position with 70,000 soldiers” (The Battle of Gettysburg). The massive amount of numbers obviously could not be
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