Global Supply Chain Management

6027 Words Mar 3rd, 2013 25 Pages
GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT FORUM
CASE: GS-54
DATE: 05/2007
Stacy Duda, LaShawn James, Zeryn Mackwani, Raul Munoz, and David Volk prepared this case under the supervision of
Professor Hau Lee as the basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of an administrative situation.
Copyright © 2007 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, e-mail the Case Writing Office at: cwo@gsb.stanford.edu or write: Case Writing
Office, Stanford Graduate School of Business, 518 Memorial Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5015. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in
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Such farmers would be more inclined and able to invest in productivity improvement tools and activities, and in their communities, thereby promoting a source of stable and sustainable coffee supply.
COMPANY BACKGROUND
Starbucks was founded in 1971 when three academics—English teacher Jerry Baldwin, history teacher Zev Siegel, and writer Gordon Bowker—opened a store called “Starbucks Coffee, Tea, and Spice” in Seattle. The partners named the company in honor of Starbuck, the coffee-loving first mate in Herman Melville 's Moby Dick. The company 's logo is a two-tailed mermaid encircled by the store 's name.
By the early 1980s, the company had four Starbucks stores in the Seattle area and had showed profitability every year since opening. However, the roles of the founders underwent major changes. Zev Siegel left the company, Jerry Baldwin took over day-to-day management and functioned as CEO, and Gordon Bowker remained involved as owner while devoting most of his time to other business ventures.
In 1982, Baldwin recruited Howard Schultz, vice president and general manager of U.S. operations for Hammarplast, a Swedish maker of stylish kitchen equipment and housewares, as head marketing and retail stores supervisor. Schultz 's biggest idea for the future of Starbucks came during the spring of 1983 when the company sent him
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