Goal Programming

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Table of Contents Chapter 1 LITERATURE SURVEY……………………………………………………. | 1 | | | 1.1 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................... | 1 | 1.2 PHILOSOPHICAL BASIS.................................................................................. | 2 | 1.3 HISTORICAL SKETCH..................................................................................... | 3 | 1.4 VARIANTS........................................................................................................ | 4 | 1.5 APPLICATIONS…………………………………………………………………….. | 5 | 1.6 STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES……………………………………………… | 6 | 1.7 THE FUTURE……………………………………………………………………….. | 7 | | | Chapter 2…show more content…
Satisficing, in turn, is an old Scottish word that defined the desire to find a practical, real-world solution to a problem – rather than a utopian, optimal solution to a highly simplified (and very possibly oversimplified) model of that problem. The concept of satisficing, as opposed to optimization, was introduced by Herbert Simon in 1956. As a consequence of the principle of satisficing, the “goodness” of any solution to a Goal Programming problem is represented by an achievement function, rather than an objective function of conventional optimization. The goal programming achievement function measures the degree of non-achievement of the problem goals. The specific way in which this non-achievement is measured characterizes the particular subtype of goal programming approach that is being employed, and may be defined so as to include the achievement of commensurable as well as non-commensurable goals. It should be emphasized that, because a goal programming problem is to be satisficed, it is possible that the solution derived may not fit, conveniently and comfortably, into the concept of optimization or efficiency (I.e. non dominated solutions) as used by more conventional forms of mathematical modeling. This is because, in Goal Programming, we seek a useful, practical, implementable, and attainable solution rather than one satisfying the
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