Essay on God Help Me I Was on Ly 19

6677 WordsJun 24, 201327 Pages
READING COMPREHENSION PRACTICE TEST PRACTICE QUESTIONS The front page of this booklet provides practice examples to show you what the questions on the real test are like. Your test administrator or teacher will now take you through these. Practice Example 1 The clown pulled silly faces to make the children laugh. The word silly in this sentence means: A: funny B: bad C: tricky D: scary E: None of these The sentence below does not have any punctuation. Choose the option with the correct punctuation. i am a good runner A: i am a good runner. B: I am a good runner C: Im a good runner. D: I am a good runner. E: None of these Practice Example 3 Emily has three dogs and two cats. They are all brown, but one of the dogs has spots. His name…show more content…
Page 2 Question 7 ‘More distance is needed to safely stop in rain or poor visibility.’ We can infer from this that: A: people drive faster in rain and poor visibility. B: the writer is merely calculating on the safe side. C: braking is more hazardous in rain and poor visibility. D: the road rules state that this must be so. E: All of these. Read the following paragraphs to answer the next two questions (Questions 8&9). There is a place forty kilometres north-east of Portland, Victoria, which makes for an unusual visit. It is Lake Condah. Here are to be found remains of aboriginal settlements: the circular stone bases of several hundred huts, rock-lined water channels, and stone tools chipped from rock not normally found in the area. One of the attractions of Lake Condah long ago was its fish and the most startling evidence of aboriginal technology and engineering to be found there are the systems built to trap fish. Water courses had been constructed by redirecting streams, building stone sides and even scraping out new channels. At strategic spots, they piled rocks across the water courses to create weirs and build funnels to channel eels and fish into conical baskets. This is an eel-fishing technique which has hardly changed to the present day. Beside some of the larger traps, there are the outlines of rectangular, stone-lined ponds, probably to hold fish and keep them fresh. On the bluffs overlooking the lake, stone circles are all that remain of
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