Going the Distance

3190 Words Nov 2nd, 2010 13 Pages
Helen Corne

Going the Distance Life is full of hard knocks. I was raised in a broken down apartment, by my single mother. She tried her best to support my sister and me. There were five apartments in each complex. There must have been at least ten trashy buildings pushed together by government funding. Each apartment had up to ten people hiding away in it. There were enough people to create our own city. The walls were so thin that I could smell the fried foods, and hear the neighbors yelling at their kids from the next apartment. The apartments stunk of bug spray, and roaches crawled out from under the doors. My clothes were handed down from my older sister who had a problem of wetting herself. My mother washed the clothes
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He told me about how much responsibility a soldier has. He stated that every soldier is responsible for performing his duty to the very best of his ability. He then mentioned how I would be responsible for my behavior. I would have to clean myself up and look like the Hollywood version of a soldier. He said that every soldier in the Army assumes this personal responsibility when they take the oath. Although this information seemed a bit overwhelming, I was captivated, and felt ready to move forward.
My next step was for the recruiter to set up an appointment for me to take a test, known as the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). This test measures the skill level of a person to fit them with the right type of job. It was a set of questions in English, Math, and Vocabulary. Although I dropped out of high school, I considered myself to be a smart person, so I was not afraid to take this test. I found out a week later that I passed it in the 90th percentile. A few days later, I was sworn into the Army, in a large gymnasium, with about 200 other recruits, and was soon on my way to basic training. This was a new way of life for me. Going from a poor boy in the projects, to having a promising future, was electrifying. I felt that by becoming a soldier, I had made the best decision of my life. The bus showed up. I stood with luggage in hand, and boarded the dim bus. I sat down next to a guy about my age, but from Guam, or some island like
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