Grand Theory Essay

722 Words May 19th, 2013 3 Pages
For the comparison discussion I will be comparing Virginia Henderson’s grand theory of Principles and Practice of Nursing to Levine’s Consevation Model of Nursing. The article I used was, “Testing a Theory of Health Promotion for Preterm Infants Based on Levine’s Conservation Model of Nursing,” by Linda Medfford, and, Martha Raile Alligood. Virginia Henderson’s grand theory of Principles and Practice of Nursing, it is explained that the grand theory is for the brain dead patient. This theory points out to the nurse that, “An indirect link also exists between the nurse caring for the organ donor and the patient or patients who might receive an organ or organs from the donor, in that the nurse’s actions and care can affect the viability of …show more content…
“Individuals who care for an infant on a more frequent basis should be better attuned to the infant's unique physiologic and behavioral cues and to unique needs of the family (Alligood, M.R., & Mefford, L.C.). When reading these two articles it is evident that quality of care is the main focus. With Levine, care is focused with the same nurse caring for the same patient. Keeping consistent care was found to benefit the patient and the family, with early release from the hospital. Virginia Hendersons theory, keeping consistency with the care given to the type of patients who are giving organs, and those receiving organs, was vital to protect the patient and the organs. “An indirect link also exists between the nurse caring for the organ donor and the patient or patients who might receive an organ or organs from the donor, in that the nurse’s actions and care can affect the viability of the organs intended for waiting recipients” (Nicely, B., & DeLario, G. T. (2011). I found that even though it appears these articles are speaking about two very different types of patients, I am reminded of the child, or infant organ donor. I think that these two theories of nursing can be used together. I am also reminded of compassion fatigue, “Nurses must also recognize the need for their own care. As a consequence of stress relating to caring for suffering patients and their families, caregivers can experience compassion fatigue, a secondary traumatic stress disorder”