Growth of Human Population and Its Effect on the Environment

1389 Words 6 Pages
The growth of the human population has been strikingly apparent that the rate of growth has been much steeper than recent times. The earlier Homo sapiens were vegetarians and gathers they hunted and fished for food. With increased knowledge humans learned how to farm, domesticate animals and used irrigation to meet their needs. The knowledge of water and sewer conditions along with better medical care and agriculture made life easier. Earlier man did not have these factors and the population remained stable, for over thousands of years.
The Toba super volcano is believed to have caused a massive environmental change. Creating a bottleneck of the human population that “occurred about seventy thousand years ago.” (Wikipedia, para. 1)
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Europeans colonized into other areas of the world bring with them diseases that would decrease the inhabitance of those regions.
Life Expectancy
With the improvement in medicine, agriculture and technology that has increased the average life expectancy. Like the children in this period once their nutritional and medical needs were met the percentage of children that died before the age of 5 has decreased
In the new world after the war of 1776 came the new age of medicine called the vaccination which makes an enormous contribution to the mortality rate. With strides in cleanliness and improvements in the medical field which; saw the induction of antibiotics and other medicines. Penicillin revolutionizes the medical community to be the first drug to have curing capabilities on such diseases as Syphilis. With the introduction of anesthesia opened new possibilities for surgical improvements. The techniques for surgery improved after the introduction of anesthesia and once microorganisms were realized as being the cause of all infection and diseases. Instead of the doctor coming to the homes of the ill they built hospitals where patients would come to obtain care. Introduced to the medical community would be routines of cleaning, hygiene and sanitizing...Including sterilizing of instruments and washing hands became routine before any medical procedure could be performed. Another form of nutrition introduced was…